The Gender Project

Bringing women on board…

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RAC District coordinator Kasese (2nd right) helping a woman to express her views during our community outreach at Kithoma in Kasese

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Women share an issue during one of gender trainings

“Educate a woman and you will have educated the nation…” Although the perpetrators of this axiom emphasized education, it ought to be extended to cover community education on corruption because for development to be realized, women have to be placed at the center point for all programs. Women play a central role in all circles – starting with the smallest unit, which is the family. Positive initiatives will no doubt impact the women greatly yet should there be any form of setback, the burden on women will be felt more intensely than their male counterparts.

Statistical data on corruption scandals worldwide depicts more men involved in unscrupulous behavior yet; the effect of their actions is more felt by women. This is the background upon which the RAC gender project was adopted. Fighting corruption without involving women can simply be equated to chasing the wind!

The RAC gender project which started two years ago has since seen 84 women from Kyenjojo and Kyegegwa district brought on board as women monitors to contribute to RAC’s anti-graft drive. Unlike our other projects, the gender project is a deliberate move to comprehensively involve women in exposing and causing action against corruption, with the aim of improving service delivery.

Various programs geared to building and strengthening their capacities in demanding for improved service delivery have been initiated. These include among others;

SMS gateway: The SMS gateway is a telecommunication technique that enables the users (women monitors) to report corruption cases sighted within the community. In the year under review, the women were given refresher trainings on the usage of this technology which greatly improved their efficacy. Through this system, many cases were reported to ACCU – which is the central processing unit for the messages that come through the SMS gate way. Cases reported include among others; staff absenteeism and late reporting to duty, illegal fees charged to patients, sale of public drugs and mismanagement of UPE funds. The cases were received and are now being investigated for relevant actions

Radio programs/talk shows: these were geared towards sensitizing the masses on the evils of corruption and how it affects service delivery. The same talk shows were used as a platform to report corruption and other service delivery concerns within the community. These issues were taken up by RAC and reported to different actors for response.

Other activities carried out under this project were; spouse training (monitors’ spouses) – this was aimed at bringing on board the spouses with the intention of enlightening them about the activities their wives are involved in for support and buy-in. civic education programs and monitoring were yet other activities carried out in the year.

This project is anticipated to go a long way in changing women’s perception in fighting corruption and because the burden of corruption has a direct effect on them, they will fight tooth and nail to curb it down.

Seed II Project

Like the Gender project, Seed II is an Action Aid funded project that seeks to strengthen the capacities of women, youth and reflect groups in the fight against corruption. Unlike the gender project which is based in the districts of Kyenjojo and Kyegegwa, Seed II is based and implemented in Bundibugyo district. Activities held under this project include: capacity building programs for women, youth and reflect groups, forum theatre, Public expenditure tracking and surveys, social audits and the general monitoring of the performance of service delivery in Bundibugyo district.

“Educate a woman and you will have educated the nation…” Although the perpetrators of this axiom emphasized education, it ought to be extended to cover community education on corruption because for development to be realized, women have to be placed at the center point for all programs. Women play a central role in all circles – starting with the smallest unit, which is the family. Positive initiatives will no doubt impact the women greatly yet should there be any form of setback, the burden on women will be felt more intensely than their male counterparts.

Statistical data on corruption scandals worldwide depicts more men involved in unscrupulous behavior yet; the effect of their actions is more felt by women. This is the background upon which the RAC gender project was adopted. Fighting corruption without involving women can simply be equated to chasing the wind!

The RAC gender project which started two years ago has since seen 84 women from Kyenjojo and Kyegegwa district brought on board as women monitors to contribute to RAC’s anti-graft drive. Unlike our other projects, the gender project is a deliberate move to comprehensively involve women in exposing and causing action against corruption, with the aim of improving service delivery.

Various programs geared to building and strengthening their capacities in demanding for improved service delivery have been initiated. These include among others;

SMS gateway: The SMS gateway is a telecommunication technique that enables the users (women monitors) to report corruption cases sighted within the community. In the year under review, the women were given refresher trainings on the usage of this technology which greatly improved their efficacy. Through this system, many cases were reported to ACCU – which is the central processing unit for the messages that come through the SMS gate way. Cases reported include among others; staff absenteeism and late reporting to duty, illegal fees charged to patients, sale of public drugs and mismanagement of UPE funds. The cases were received and are now being investigated for relevant actions

Radio programs/talk shows: these were geared towards sensitizing the masses on the evils of corruption and how it affects service delivery. The same talk shows were used as a platform to report corruption and other service delivery concerns within the community. These issues were taken up by RAC and reported to different actors for response.

Other activities carried out under this project were; spouse training (monitors’ spouses) – this was aimed at bringing on board the spouses with the intention of enlightening them about the activities their wives are involved in for support and buy-in. civic education programs and monitoring were yet other activities carried out in the year.

This project is anticipated to go a long way in changing women’s perception in fighting corruption and because the burden of corruption has a direct effect on them, they will fight tooth and nail to curb it down.

Seed II Project

Like the Gender project, Seed II is an Action Aid funded project that seeks to strengthen the capacities of women, youth and reflect groups in the fight against corruption. Unlike the gender project which is based in the districts of Kyenjojo and Kyegegwa, Seed II is based and implemented in Bundibugyo district. Activities held under this project include: capacity building programs for women, youth and reflect groups, forum theatre, Public expenditure tracking and surveys, social audits and the general monitoring of the performance of service delivery in Bundibugyo district.

Project results realized from this project include;

• Higher self esteem for monitors derived from public respect and knowledge attained.

• The monitors are now more knowledgeable and enlightened about their rights and can therefore demand for better services.

• There is a growing conscience on the general conduct amongst public servants knowing that the monitors are watching; should they fail to fulfill their obligations, they will be brought to book.

• General improvement in service delivery especially the health centers.

• Increased number of cases reported and addressed by different actors.

• Higher self esteem for monitors derived from public respect and knowledge attained.

• The monitors are now more knowledgeable and enlightened about their rights and can therefore demand for better services.

• There is a growing conscience on the general conduct amongst public servants knowing that the monitors are watching; should they fail to fulfill their obligations, they will be brought to book.

• General improvement in service delivery especially the health centers.

• Increased number of cases reported and addressed by different actors.

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